Pipeline Spilling 300,000 Gallons Kills Fish and Other Animals.

On Dec 27, 2021, in New Orleans a pipe bursts and spills 300,000 Gallons into two artificially made ponds. Killing Fish, Birds. and other wildlife. According to the State and Local Official, a majority of the fuel was recovered.

Yet that’s not the point is it? Animal Life was lost due to yet, another pipeline burst.

According to the pipeline owner. The spill from the 16-inch-diameter line operated by Collins Pipeline Co. was discovered on Dec. 27 near a levee in St. Bernard Parish, just east of New Orleans, according to documents from the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration.

An inspection of the 42-year-old Meraux Pipeline more than a year earlier, in October 2020, revealed external corrosion along a 22-foot section of pipe in the same area as the spill. But repairs were delayed and the line continued operating after a subsequent inspection indicated the corrosion was not bad enough to require work immediately under federal regulations, according to the pipeline agency.

Let me remind the people of how serious Corrosion is when it comes to pipelines. Or how dangerous it is when ship hauls are weak.

Ten years later, BP oil spill continues to harm wildlife—especially dolphins
Credit National Geographic
BP OIL SPILL JUNE 4 2010
Mauritius oil spill turns ocean water black, threatens marine life - CGTN
Photo Credit CGTN
On July 25, Japanese ship MV Wakashio struck a coral reef on the southeast coast of Mauritius, spilling thousands of tons of fuel into the ocean. Soon the crystal-clear water turned black, triggering an environmental catastrophe.

The New Orleans spilled fuel also contaminated soil in an environmentally sensitive area near the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet, a closed canal, according to state and federal officials. A small amount of diesel remains in the two borrow pits, said Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality spokesman Gregory Langley.

Fuel Companies like BP and Collins do not care about the environment, they are killing everything slowly, and for what? GREED!

If Fuel Companies cannot stick to protocols and safety management, then what’s the point of even having a pipeline? Why not just spill it completely and kill everything right now instead of slowly. Get it over with, and by the time you want to collect that cash, you’ll have no customer base.

This is exactly one of the most important reasons why the majority of advocates are speaking up for NEW SOURCES of CLEAN FUEL. I understand switching from OIL to either Hydro, Corn, or Wind power is expensive. However, in the long run, it is worth it. You would be producing more jobs, truckers would be able to safely transport the water, corn oil, and or wind turbines. Companies would be able to make money from a cleaner fuel source. Everyone would win in this scenario.

Because you can’t get sick off of Corn Oil, Water/Hydro, or even Wind. The fact that companies say there is no money in cleaner fuel sources, is hyperbolic. The electric fuel source for cars – they’re making the figures to keep them around. To be fair the majority of people actually want a cleaner way of life, which is why many have switched to “Solar Power” and “Electric Cars”.

Besides that, these Oil Companies have Nearly Depleted these fossil fuels, there really isn’t much left. And this is also why gas prices have risen. Supply and Demand. It’s time to switch to a cleaner source of fuel.

This year should be the year where companies switch. It’s 2022 we should be more advanced by now. We should be on the cleaner path, we only have one planet, there is no escape when this planet dies off completely. Look at Mars for that example.

How To Research A Rescue

When supporting any rescue of your choosing we recommend and encourage that you do your research first. It is imperative and crucial that you thoroughly investigate them. Otherwise, you could wind up enabling fraudulent individuals, where proceeds do not contribute to animal’s well being.

The How To:
If said rescue has a facility, make sure someone can investigate the facility in person. If you think of sending an animal there, including if you are sending pets there – it is your right to make sure that your pets will be treated well and safe before their new guardians adopt them.
Calling local animal control and other rescues in said area to get references, while also making sure the rescue of your choosing isn’t banned from pulling, is a must. Speak with the Founder or Representative of the rescue you are choosing, ask if they spay and neuter all animals before adoption. If they do not you may as well be contributing to a “breeder”. A rescues goal is to prevent the breeding process that creates unwanted litters, it is the basic part of animal rescue to spay and neuter.
Ask for vet reference and very they spay or neuter. Ask to see a copy of the adoption application and ask if they do home checks.
Google is everyone’s friend at times – Research the rescues name, director’s name and any email addresses/phone numbers that may be associated with said rescue.

Red Flags:
Not allowing anyone to visit their facility
Does Not spay or neuter all animals before adoption
Becomes angry/agitated/defensive that you are asking questions and or researching them.
They post on Facebook, Myspace or other social platforms that they can’t afford vet care, yet are still taking in more animals.
They have threatened to close their doors in the past.
They have animals in boarding yet are still taking in more animals.
They are banned from pulling
They support hoarders, flippers or use “Craigslist”.
They don’t vet pets upon intake or spay and neuter.
They don’t do home visits or have adoption applications.
And if No one has ever heard of them.
When they are not licensed or a non-profit, you can verify that with the IRS or Open Records.
Remember these red flags and remember to do research so you are not fooled by the fakes.

HOW TO KILL & CONTROL SPOTTED LANTERNFLY

What is spotted lanternfly?
The spotted lanternfly resembles a moth when it jumps or flies, but in reality, it is neither a fly nor a moth. It is a type of planthopper that belongs to the Order Hemiptera (cicadas, leafhoppers, and aphids). The adults prefer to feed primarily on the non-native host plant “tree of heaven” (Allianthus altissima) while the immature stages (or nymphs) will feed on a wide range of trees, fruits, and even grape vines. Spotted lanternfly egg masses (or clusters of eggs) are brown, seed-like in appearance, and about 1-inch long. They are covered in a mud-like secretion that helps them stay glued to a surface in a mass. After they hatch, the nymphs go through 4 growth phases, or instars. Immature nymphs are black with white spots, and they gain red markings at they mature through the 4th instar. Late stage nymphs are about ½-inch in length. Adult spotted lanternflies are 1-inch long, have brownish forewings with black spots and hindwings that are red with black spots.

What trees do they damage?
Spotted lanternflies will feed on a variety of host plants from May through November, and their feeding preferences change as they mature. Nymphs will feed on a wide-range of host plants while the adults target only a few species. There are over 65 known species of plants that the SLF will feed on, including ornamental trees (like lilac and dogwood), fruit trees, vines (like grapes), small fruits (such as blueberries), hops, and several vegetables.

Preferred plant species for SLF nymphs:
Tree of heaven
Willow
Maple
Poplar
Prunus spp. (plums, cherries, peaches, nectarines, apricots)
Apple
Pine
Grape vines
Preferred tree species for SLF adults:
Tree of heaven
Willow

In addition to this information many of the East Coast farmers and businesses rely on these trees for financial stability. More over, this makes up approximately, 65 percent of the East Coasts economy.

How to control spotted lanternfly

There are 5 steps that need to be taken to help control and prevent the spread of spotted lanternfly.

Stop the spread. If you live in or visit areas of the U.S. where SLF has been found, check any outdoor items for egg masses before moving them. This includes vehicles, firewood, outdoor furniture, picnic tables, boats, and children’s toys.

Remove the eggs. From late September through May, be on the lookout for egg masses. The egg masses can be scraped off surfaces using a knife or a thin plastic card. The egg masses should be sealed in a plastic bag or placed directly into hand sanitizer or alcohol to kill them before they are disposed of.

Control the nymphs. From late April through early November, tree banding using a product like Tree Tanglefoot® Insect Barrier, can be done to high risk host trees to capture the nymphs as the climb the trunk to feed. The tree bands should be routinely removed and replaced every 1 to 2 weeks through July. Nymphs can also be controlled by spraying them with Ortho® Home Defense® Insect Killer for Lawn & Landscape Concentrate and Ready-To-Spray or Ortho® Bug B Gon® Insect Killer for Lawns & Gardens Concentrate and Ready-To-Spray following label directions.

Remove tree of heaven. From mid-summer through early-fall, cut down high-risk host plants for the adult SLF, like tree of heaven. To prevent the SLF from damaging other plants on your property, only remove about 90% of the host trees and use the remaining 10% as “trap trees” so you can control the adult SLFs. Cut down the trees and then treat the stumps with a tough brush killer, like Ortho® MAX® Poison Ivy & Tough Brush Killer Concentrate, following label directions. Note: Tree of heaven is difficult to control and may require several applications to fully kill the root system. Remember, if you live in a quarantined county in PA, the wood cannot be removed from the quarantined area.

Control the adults. When the adults emerge from June-August, control them with an insecticide application. Ortho® Home Defense® Insect Killer for Lawn & Landscape Concentrate and Ready-To-Spray or Ortho® Bug B Gon® Insect Killer for Lawns & Gardens Concentrate and Ready-To-Spray will kill spotted lanternfly on contact when applied following label directions.

Please remember that all sightings of spotted lanternfly adults, nymphs, and egg masses should be reported to your local university extension or state plant regulatory official, as well as the PA Department of agriculture.

Quarantined States:
Pennsylvania
Delaware
New Jersey
New York
Virginia
Washington D.C.
Maryland

We’re still gathering information on more quarantined states.

The Spotted Lanternfly Invasion

The Spotted Lanternfly has invaded the East Coast of the United States. This type of insect has no natural predators here and is an invasive species. The CDC and the Department Of Agriculture are urging residents throughout the East Coast to kill singles on sight and report infestations. The LanternFly, if not eradicated can destroy plant life, such as crops, trees and other resources we need to sustain livability.

In a Facebook post early Friday morning, the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture warned that spotted lanternfly nymphs are beginning to change colors and are becoming more destructive.

“They’re growing! And…changing? #SpottedLanternfly nymphs are beginning to turn red,” the post warned. If you see a #BadBug that looks like this, kill singles and report infestations!!!

The egg masses from spotted lanternflies can generally be seen on various species of trees through the month of May, before the lanternfly begins to hatch.

Nymphs first appear black with white spots and are wingless, but ultimately develops red patches and white spots as they mature. At this point, the Department of Agriculture says:

Nymphs are now over a half-inch inch long
Jump readily when approached or touched
Adult spotted lanternflies begin appearing in July. At rest, they are large bugs sporting grayish wings with black spots, and the tips are black and gray.

When flying or startled, the insect will display vibrant red hind wings
Adults are around 1 inch long and a half inch wide with wings folded
Adults can jump several feet when startled or approached
Officials are urging anyone who sees this invasive bug to kill if possible and to report infestations online at https://extension.psu.edu/.

The state continues to fight the spread of the spotted lanternfly. In April, the Department of Agriculture began requiring businesses to have a permit to move goods and vehicles within and out of the lanternfly quarantine zone, which includes Lehigh and Northampton counties and most of eastern Pennsylvania. Inspectors continue to be on the lookout for businesses to make sure they have a permit that indicates the company has completed training on the quarantine rules.

Businesses face deadline to get spotted lanternfly permit
Officials are reminding any business without a permit to obtain one and learn the basics of spotting the spotted lanternfly.

Origin and distribution
Spotted lanternfly is native to China and is present in Southeast Asia. It was first reported in South Korea in 2006 and rapidly spread to different parts of the country.

Host range
Spotted lanternfly feeds on a variety of host plants including fruit trees, ornamental trees, woody trees, and vines. Apples, birch, cherry, dogwood, grapes, Korean Evodia, lilac, maple, poplar, stone fruits, and tree-of-heaven are among more than 70 species of hosts attacked by this pest. Tree-of-heaven, which contains high concentrations of cytotoxic alkaloids, is one of the favorite hosts. This is probably why spotted lanternfly is considered poisonous and used in traditional Chinese medicine. Other preferred hosts such as Korean Evodia (Bebe tree) are also used in oriental medicine suggesting that spotted lanternfly has a high preference for hosts that contain toxic secondary metabolites. Observations in South Korea also indicate that spotted lanternfly appears to have a wider host range early in life as young nymphs and a narrow range as they grow older, especially before egg laying. Choosing plants with toxic metabolites for egg laying is thought to be a mechanism of defense to protect from natural enemies. Although grape vine does not have toxic metabolites like these other hosts, spotted lanternfly showed a strong preference in studies conducted in South Korea. Sugar content of the host plant also appears to play a role in their choice with a preference for hosts containing high sucrose and fructose content.

Damage
Adults and nymphs feed on phloem tissues of foliage and young stems with their piercing and sucking mouth-parts and excrete large quantities of liquid. Due to the sugar content of the liquid, plant parts covered with spotted lanternfly excretion harbor mold growth, which could hinder plant growth or even cause death.

Scientists/biologists are working on a way to cull the lanternflies numbers. Right now they believe a fungus and a local wasp species are able to decrease the lanternflies numbers. When we receive more information pertaining to the certainty we will update.

Deadly Plants: Keep Cats Away

Cats and the very many surfaces they climb are always full of dangers. One of those dangers are household plants; many owners do not realize that even the common of household plants can hold the deadliest of toxins for our beloved feline fur kids. I am going to go over the plants that are deadly for your feline fur kid and try my best to give a description of what it may do. Then try to help with how to better store or show off your plants without any cat chewing or eating your plants.
Like many guardians over the years since, I had the privilege of taken care of many companions I thoroughly did my research, to prevent accidents in our home from happening. You would be amazed at the information I found on the toxicity on common plants.
From Lilies to Tulips having this information can help prevent accidents.

Amaryllis (Amaryllis sp.)

The plant contains similar toxins to the flowers in the Narcissus group or the Belladonna Amaryllis (the only true Amaryllis). The leaves, stems and bulbs contain phenanthridine alkaloids, which can cause vomiting, hypo-tension (drop in blood pressure), and respiratory depression. Excess salivation and abdominal discomfort can be seen from the raphide oxalate crystals, which are more concentrated in the bulbs.
• Common Names: Belladonna lily, Saint Joseph lily, Cape Belladonna, Naked Lady
Family: Amaryllidaceae
Toxic Principles: Lycorine and others
Clinical Signs: vomiting, depression, diarrhea, abdominal pain, hyper-salivation, anorexia, tremors.

Autumn and Spring Crocus

Two types of Crocus plants a spring and autumn, spring crocus are more commonly found, depending on your geographical location. However, the spring crocus plants, although not as bad as the Autumn Crocus can still cause issues for your companion. In addition, the Spring and Autumn plant almost always get mistaken for each other. The Spring Crocus can still cause however, a varying of symptoms, such as general gastrointestinal upset, drooling, vomiting and diarrhea.
• The Autumn Crocus:
Additional Names: Meadow Saffron, Colchium, spring crocus, crocus
Scientific Name: Colchicum autumnale
Family: Liliaceae
Toxicity: Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Horses
Toxic Principles: colchicine and other alkaloids
Clinical Signs: oral irritation, bloody vomiting, diarrhea, shock, multi-organ damage, bone marrow suppression.

Azaleas and Rhododendrons

Azalea is actually a species of Rhododendron. Over 1000 species of rhododendrons/azaleas exist. The small, deciduous species are referred to as the Azalea and the large, woody shrubs as Rhododendrons. The Rhododendron is more toxic but this can vary drastically due to the hybridization of these two common plants. These plants contain grayanotoxins which disrupt sodium channels affecting the skeletal and cardiac muscle. All parts of the plant are considered poisonous, and as little as ingestion of 0.2% of an animal’s body weight can result in poisoning. When ingested, clinical signs include gastrointestinal signs (e.g., drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, inappetance), cardiovascular (e.g., abnormal heart rate, heart arrhythmias, weakness, hypotension), and central nervous system signs (e.g., depression, tremors, transient blindness, seizures, coma, etc.). The overall prognosis is fair with treatment.
Common signs to watch for:
Drooling
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Inappetance
Abdominal pain
Abnormal heart rate and rhythms
Hypotension
Weakness
Tremors
Depression
Blindness
Seizures
Coma
Common Names: Rosebay, Rhododendron
Scientific Name: Rhododendron spp
Family: Ericaceae
Toxicity: Toxic to Cats, Toxic to Horses
Toxic Principles: Grayantoxin

Easter lily – Yes even some of our most favourite flowers are hazardous to our precious fur kids. The Easter lily the common yet beautiful flower we obtain for the Easter holiday is deadly to our companions.

The more dangerous, potentially fatal lilies are true lilies of the Lilium or Hemerocallis species. Examples of some of these dangerous lilies include the tiger, day, Asiatic hybrid, Easter, Japanese Show, rubrum, stargazer, red, Western, and wood lilies – all of which are highly toxic to cats! Even small ingestion’s (such as 2-3 petals or leaves) – even the pollen or water from the vase – can result in severe, acute kidney failure.
Other types of dangerous lilies include lily of the valley. This type does not cause kidney failure, but can cause life-threatening heart arrhythmia’s and death when ingested by dogs or cats.
If your cat is seen consuming any part of a lily, bring your cat (and the plant) immediately to a veterinarian for medical care. The sooner you bring in your cat, the better and more efficiently, the lily poisoning can be treated. Decontamination (like inducing vomiting and giving binders like activated charcoal) are imperative in the early toxic stage, while aggressive intravenous fluid therapy, kidney function monitoring tests, and supportive care can greatly improve the prognosis. Intravenous fluids must be started within an 18-hour window for the best outcome.
Common signs to watch for:
Inappetance
Lethargy
Hiding
Vomiting
Diarrhea
Halitosis
Dehydration
Inappropriate urination or thirst
Seizures
Death
Scientific name: Lilium longiflorum
Alternate names: Lilies, Easter lily, tiger lily, rubrum lily, red lily, wood lily, Western lily, stargazer lily, daylily, Japanese show lily, Asiatic lily, Asiatic hydrid lily, peace lily, calla lily, lily of the valley, Lilium longiflorum, Lilium tigrinum, Lilium speciosum, Lilium auratum, Lilium lancifolimu, Lilium umbellantum, Hemerocallis
For more information on other deadly plants that your companions should stay away from please use this site here: http://petpoisonhelp.wpengine.com/poisons/ If your pet ingested these plants, go straight to your veterinarian or contact the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Centre at 888-426-4435.

To keep your plants while also keeping your companions safe. You can buy a terrarium with a lid, or turn your old fish/lizard tank into a terrarium to protect your plants and your animals from accidental damage and death. There are also other methods such as placing your plants in a cabinet with windowed doors on them “China or Nick Knack Cabinets”, alternatively, placing your plants outside, in a small greenhouse viewable to passersby if you want to show the beauty and elegance. There are many items around your household you can turn into a “terrarium”. If you need idea’s just use google for inspiration.

However, make sure it is out of reach from your companion or the very least in a room you keep your companion from going into.

Simparica: Warning – Dangerous Drug For Dogs

Zoetis the company that manufactures the flea and tick drug Simparica, have been falsely claiming that the drug is safe. In truth, the drug is known to cause deadly seizures and ataxia in pets who take the drug.

Even the FDA and AVMA knew of the hazardous side effects linked to Simparica, yet still approved it to be used for the treatment of fleas and ticks.

Four flea, tick products linked to seizures, ataxia

Posted Oct. 31, 2018

Four flea and tick products may cause seizures, tremors, and lost coordination in some cats and dogs.

Food and Drug Administration officials have received thousands of reports of adverse events connected with three products—Bravecto, Nexgard, and Simparica—containing drugs in the isoxazoline class. The agency approved a fourth product, Credelio, containing a drug in the class this year.

“The FDA is working with manufacturers of isoxazoline products to include new label information to highlight neurologic events because these events were seen consistently across the isoxazoline class of products,” a Sept. 20 announcement states.

The agency has approved all four products since 2013 for treatment and prevention of flea infestations and treatment and control of tick infestations. They are safe and effective for most pets, but veterinarians should use patient medical histories to decide whether isoxazoline-class drugs are appropriate, the announcement states.

Siobhan DeLancey, who is a spokeswoman for the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine, said the agency has received about 5,400 reports of adverse events connected with the drugs.

She provided a statement that said agency officials are seeing reports of neurologic events at similar rates across the isoxazoline product class, when those reports are compared with sales data. But the agency is unable to compare among products because it’s impossible to know how many of the doses sold have been administered.

Researchers who conducted preapproval studies saw some of the neurologic signs, and some of the product labels already note that potential, DeLancey said. In the reports of adverse events since approval, some animals developed seizures with no known history of them.

Most of the reports involve dogs, but whether the risk is higher in dogs or cats is unknown. Only one of the products—Bravecto—is approved for use in cats.

FDA reports that summarize evidence used toward approval of the four products include descriptions of seizures, tremors, ataxia, and lethargy among a small number of dogs and ataxia in a few cats involved in clinical trials. Results of one trial for Simparica involving a small number of 8-week-old puppies, for example, indicated that those that received higher doses were more likely to have neurologic signs.

https://www.avma.org/news/javmanews/pages/181115h.aspx

Do not give your companion animals these medications. The seizures are a lifelong side effect. It does not go away at all. Once neurological damage takes place there is no reversing the damage. There is only a long road of treatments via more medication.

There’s proof of Simparica induced seizures all over the Web. Youtube for an example of a recent victim of simparica can be found here: https://youtu.be/pZF4eTSQEYU

For the correct information on dealing with seizures. You are supposed to move everything dangerous out of their way. Cushion their head as well as gently hold them and comfort them, Until the seizure has passed.

If your companions are suffering from seizures it’s best to take them to a Veterinarians Office immediately after the episode. Preferably a different veterinarian who didn’t prescribe the medication.